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Alcoholics Anonymous AA

Alcoholics Anonymous And The Beginning


The community of Alcoholics Anonymous has been providing great support and healing for recovering alcoholics for nearly 80 years. Alcoholics Anonymous was founded in 1935 by Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith both of whom were alcoholics, aiming to encourage others to quit and remain sober. The two founders compiled the twelve steps to direct AA meetings; later they introduced the 12 traditions to help better define the aims of the group. The original 12 steps are still intact; besides, many former alcohol addicts contribute to the group by helping the members make steps to recovery.


There are over 50,000 recovering alcoholics that are part of Alcoholics Anonymous group in the country and over 2 million around the globe.


What To Expect From Aa

For first timers, getting the courage to go to an AA meeting may pose a challenge. The idea of going to a room full of people you don't know you are going through a problem and are seeking help can be intimidating. It however gets easy becomes all the members share a common experience like yours. AA was founded by recovering alcohol addicts and its model has remained till today. For recovering alcoholics, AA provides a special environment where they can open up and not feel judged because every person involved was an alcoholic at some point.


At each AA meeting, the attendees are welcomed to join the group. While a discussion among new attendees is certainly encouraged it is not essential. This is because it takes time for one to build trust so they can open up to strangers. After the members has started sharing their experience with others, they'll start seeing some positive changes in their lives.


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Difference Between Closed And Open Meetings

Closed AA meeting is open only for people who are recovering alcohol addicts or the people who are interested in knowing more about how to overcome their addiction.

The family and people close to the recovering alcoholic are allowed to attend the open meetings. You have the option of deciding whether you want to attend a closed meeting or an open meeting depending on your comfort level within the organisation. This is mainly because some people do not want to involve their families and friends in their struggle with alcoholism and the recovery process. For others, the love and support of friends and family members during meetings is important.


The 12 Steps Of Aa

The 12 steps originated in Alcoholics Anonymous, have become the standard for almost all addiction recovery groups. The steps are meant to be followed as a cycle although they are listed linearly. A patient may repeat a particular step until they are certified with the results.

Accepting the fact that you are suffering from alcoholism is usually the first stage you go through. Further steps include the following: making a firm decision to quit; admitting all your wrongs to yourself and others; making amends for all wrongdoings; and commitment to permanent improvement. More on the 12 steps can be found here


Reasons For Not Going To Aa Meetings

Some people do not want to attend the gatherings because of excuses. Some of their common objections are the following:

  • They doubt that attending the meeting will help
  • They are afraid of confronting someone they know
  • They haven't seen their alcoholism as a problem yet

Knowing the main objective of attending the meeting will help you overcome some of these excuses and recover from your addiction.

If you suspect that the problem exists, you're probably right. Attending a meeting can possibly save you from years of heartache caused by your alcoholism it can in no way be harmful.


Aa Groups Near You

Regardless of where you are living you will not have any difficulties in finding an AA group within the locality. There is usually a schedule of meetings for each group; it is best to join as soon as you can. Choose the kind of a meeting you want to attend - a closed or open one - and in what area, and you will be able to find a group online using our meeting finder. Let us provide you the help to find an AA group today please contact 0800 246 1509.